The show begins with a musical overture played on a pair of bronze gamelan instruments. A series of rapid passages leads to the introduction of the kayonan—the ‘tree of life’ puppet that opens every show. From there, puppeteer Rekayasa brings in more characters that tell an episode from one of the Hindu epics: the Mahabharata and Ramayana. (photo by Olivia Deng)
       
     
 The audience is free to watch from the behind the screen to see the performers at work, or enjoy the flickering shadows and shimmering sounds from the front.
       
     
  “The performance I saw entranced an audience of children, college students, and senior citizens. The virtuoso performers distilled the essence of the art form into a presentation that was accessible, entertaining and illuminating.”    —Ron Jenkins, author of "Saraswati in Bali: A Temple, A Museum and A Mask"
       
     
       
     
 Night falls as the story of “The Death of Patih Sumantri” unfolds at Pulaski Park in Northampton, MA.
       
     
       
     
 The show begins with a musical overture played on a pair of bronze gamelan instruments. A series of rapid passages leads to the introduction of the kayonan—the ‘tree of life’ puppet that opens every show. From there, puppeteer Rekayasa brings in more characters that tell an episode from one of the Hindu epics: the Mahabharata and Ramayana. (photo by Olivia Deng)
       
     

The show begins with a musical overture played on a pair of bronze gamelan instruments. A series of rapid passages leads to the introduction of the kayonan—the ‘tree of life’ puppet that opens every show. From there, puppeteer Rekayasa brings in more characters that tell an episode from one of the Hindu epics: the Mahabharata and Ramayana. (photo by Olivia Deng)

 The audience is free to watch from the behind the screen to see the performers at work, or enjoy the flickering shadows and shimmering sounds from the front.
       
     

The audience is free to watch from the behind the screen to see the performers at work, or enjoy the flickering shadows and shimmering sounds from the front.

  “The performance I saw entranced an audience of children, college students, and senior citizens. The virtuoso performers distilled the essence of the art form into a presentation that was accessible, entertaining and illuminating.”    —Ron Jenkins, author of "Saraswati in Bali: A Temple, A Museum and A Mask"
       
     

“The performance I saw entranced an audience of children, college students, and senior citizens. The virtuoso performers distilled the essence of the art form into a presentation that was accessible, entertaining and illuminating.”

—Ron Jenkins, author of "Saraswati in Bali: A Temple, A Museum and A Mask"

       
     

The show begins with a meeting between the king Rahwana and his two servants Delem and Sangut, from a performance at Pulaski Park in Northampton, MA.

 Night falls as the story of “The Death of Patih Sumantri” unfolds at Pulaski Park in Northampton, MA.
       
     

Night falls as the story of “The Death of Patih Sumantri” unfolds at Pulaski Park in Northampton, MA.

       
     

Select moments from “The Kidnapping of Subhadra,” performed at New York’s historic Old Stone House.